November 17, 2010

Miracle Again!/再び奇跡が!

Last year, a miracle happened to my daughter, as I briefly described here:
Miracle!/奇跡!
This year, my son found clusters of oyster mushrooms on the same spot! I can't tell you exactly where this tree is located; let me just say it is within a 10-minute walk from my house.
去年は、奇跡が娘に起きました。ここにちょっと書いたように:Miracle!/奇跡!
今年は、息子が同じ場所でヒラタケの群生を見つけました!この木がどこにあるかはっきりは言えませんが、家から歩いて10分以内のところです。



My son and I made clear soup with some of the oyster mushrooms.
息子と一緒にヒラタケの一部を使ってお吸い物を作りました。

1,200 ml water
2 tsp instant dashi
1 tsp salt
1 tbsp soy sauce
2 eggs
Fresh oyster mushroom
水 1,200 ml
出汁の素 小さじ2
塩 小さじ1
醤油 大さじ1
卵 2個
生のヒラタケ

We also made "foil-yaki".
ホイル焼きも作りました。

Place a sheet of aluminum foil on the tray, place oyster mushroom, sprinkle some sake, close the aluminum foil, put in the toaster oven, and heat for 8-10 min. Sprinkle some citrus fruit juice (yuzu juice for us) and soy sauce.
トレイにアルミホイルを載せ、ヒラタケを載せ、お酒を少し振りかけ、ホイルを閉じて、オーブントースターに入れ、8~10分加熱します。柑橘系の果汁(私たちの場合は柚子果汁)と醤油をかけます。

We still have a lot of oyster mushrooms left, and we are going to make more dishes with them!
ヒラタケはまだ一杯残っているので、まだ沢山料理を作るつもりです!

10 comments:

Bbq Dude said...

What a fantastic find. That looks really tasty.

Hiroyuki said...

Bbq Dude: Those mushrooms were really tasty!

tama Matsuoka said...

Hiroyuki san, here in the Northeast US it has been a good year for finding oyster mushrooms. The difficult decision is whether to wait a day longer for them to get bigger, or eat it right away! Many people are sauteeing in butter, garlic and shallots. We will try your recipe tomorrow.

PS Do you have any recipe for the berries of : ampelopsis brevipedunculata (I dont know the Japanese name). they are from asia and ripe now.

Hiroyuki said...

tama Matsuoka: The sad thing about hiratake (oyster mushrooms) is that in Japan, they are still often sold under the false name of shimeji. I think oyster mushrooms are versatile (can be used in almost any dish) and deserve to be called by their real name.

Ampelopsis brevipedunculata is nobudo (wild grape)?
http://homepage3.nifty.com/healthycare/nobudou.html
(Japanese only)
I can find only medicinal uses it.

tama Matsuoka said...

hiroyuki san, I have a big question for you about how you use any recipes for the January 7 nanakusa: The Festival of Seven Herbs, or Nanakusa no sekku (七草の節句), is the long-standing Japanese custom of eating seven-herb rice porridge (nanakusa-gayu) on January 7 (Jinjitsu).
The nanakusa are seven edible wild herbs of spring. Traditionally, they are :
Japanese parsley (芹 : せり seri)
Shepherd's purse (薺 : なずな nazuna)
Jersey Cudweed (御形 : ごぎょう gogyō)
Common chickweed (繁縷 : はこべら hakobera)
Henbit (仏の座 : ほとけのざ hotokenoza)
Turnip (菘 : すずな suzuna)
Daikon (蘿蔔 : すずしろ suzushiro)
There is considerable variation in the precise ingredients, with common local herbs often being substituted.
On the morning of January 7, or the night before, people place the nanakusa, rice scoop, and/or wooden pestle on the cutting board and, facing the good-luck direction, chant "Before the birds of the continent (China) fly to Japan, let's get nanakusa" while cutting the herbs into pieces. The chant may vary.
The seventh of the first month has been an important Japanese festival since ancient times. The custom of eating nanakusa-gayu on this day, to bring longevity and health, developed in Japan from a similar ancient Chinese custom, intended to ward off evil. Since there is little green at that time of the year, the young green herbs bring color to the table and eating them suits the spirit of the New Year.



The plants in autumn festival are also very very interesting and available in the US.

The spring-time nanakusa are mirrored by the "seven flowers of autumn", which are bush clover (hagi), miscanthus (obana, Miscanthus sinensis), kudzu, large pink (nadeshiko, Dianthus superbus), yellow floweredvalerian (ominaeshi, Patrinia scabiosaefolia), boneset (fujibakama, Eupatorium fortunei), and Chinese bellflower (kikyō). These seven autumn flowers provide visual enjoyment. Their simplicity was very much admired: they are small and dainty yet beautifully colored. They are named as typical autumn flowers in a verse from the Man'yōshū anthology.
[edit]

tama Matsuoka said...

hiroyuki san, I have a big question for you about how you use any recipes for the January 7 nanakusa: The Festival of Seven Herbs, or Nanakusa no sekku (七草の節句), is the long-standing Japanese custom of eating seven-herb rice porridge (nanakusa-gayu) on January 7 (Jinjitsu).
The nanakusa are seven edible wild herbs of spring. Traditionally, they are :
Japanese parsley (芹 : せり seri)
Shepherd's purse (薺 : なずな nazuna)
Jersey Cudweed (御形 : ごぎょう gogyō)
Common chickweed (繁縷 : はこべら hakobera)
Henbit (仏の座 : ほとけのざ hotokenoza)
Turnip (菘 : すずな suzuna)
Daikon (蘿蔔 : すずしろ suzushiro)

The seventh of the first month has been an important Japanese festival since ancient times. Since there is little green at that time of the year, the young green herbs bring color to the table and eating them suits the spirit of the New Year.



The plants in autumn festival are also very very interesting and available in the US.

The spring-time nanakusa are mirrored by the "seven flowers of autumn", which are bush clover (hagi), miscanthus (obana, Miscanthus sinensis), kudzu, large pink (nadeshiko, Dianthus superbus), yellow floweredvalerian (ominaeshi, Patrinia scabiosaefolia), boneset (fujibakama, Eupatorium fortunei), and Chinese bellflower (kikyō). These seven autumn flowers provide visual enjoyment. Their simplicity was very much admired: they are small and dainty yet beautifully colored. They are named as typical autumn flowers in a verse from the Man'yōshū anthology.
[edit]

Hiroyuki said...

tama Matsuoka: The only dish that I can think of at the moment is seri gohan.
One example:
http://erecipe.woman.excite.co.jp/detail/9f27399fe9c88e2f8245507ac2aa112b.html
(Japanese only).
My father happens to be a great fan of seri gohan. His recipe is a slightly different from most others. Stir-fry chopped seri in a pan with some oil (or maybe margarine), add gohan (cooked rice), mix well, and finally add some soy sauce. One of his all-time favorites.
I will make additional comments about other herbs when I have more free time.

Hiroyuki said...

tama Matsuoka: Today, I made a small post about the seven herbs of spring today.
http://hiro-shio.blogspot.com/2010/12/haru-no-nanakusa-seven-herbs-of-spring.html

tama said...

hi Hiroyuki-san. My inlaws are visiting and I made a chawanmushi with hakobe, shiitake, wild garlic shoots and cardamine hirsuta (related to: tanetsukebana)
Tama

Hiroyuki said...

tama-san: Lucky you and your in-laws! Here in my snowy area, the ground is now completely covered with the first major snowfall of the season.